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Subjective view on your countries presidential campaign.
Published on July 1, 2008 By Scotteh In Politics

The following article is my subjective view of the American presidential election. I'll get the disclaimer out of the way first. I’m not American, I’m not as informed as many of you regarding the current presidential race with regards to policies and so on however, as I have already said, this is my subjective view (opinion) and if anything will prove as a good way to perhaps educate myself on the subject further.

I think the likes of the e-mail floating around that contain out of context quotes that was recently used in a JU article as a reference for an example of Obama’s supposed lack of patriotism and racial mentality shows at what length people are willing to go to just to influence the opinions of the masses, with one of our very own JU users falling for it when they used it as a reference.

The article in question can be found HERE.

It is all to often that we get people reacting in way that is can only be described as hearing only what they want to hear. People read that Obama is racists and anti-American, get floated an out of context quote and before you know its common fact amongst certain communities.

That’s not to say there haven’t been some genuine criticisms of Obama that should be debated properly, such as his position on Iraq, oil drilling and I think perhaps the most controversial issue of all, his former pastor.

The first two, I’m not all that clued up on, other than reading other JU users articles and what I’ve seen on the http://www.bbc.co.uk (which is very little). The third issue however was something that intrigued me, as I had heard the name of his pastor previously. As someone who is passionate about secularism, I’m all too familiar with the Nation of Islam (of whom Obama’s former pastor used to be a member).

I’m all to familiar with what he’s said and what he and others like him have said, they themselves are not the problem, its those that listen to them. I think far less would take these people seriously had the opportunities such as racial segregation and poor American foreign policy not existed. The likes of Henry Kissinger playing a game of chess with the world are out right the cause of so many of today’s major issues. With regards to racial segregation, thankfully America as a state has removed this, but the aftermath of it still lingers like the unwanted odor of washed up drunk stood behind you in the queue at the paper store as your purchasing the morning gazette.

I think something like segregation of the races will be a thing of the past in years to come, but there are still to many people with deep rooted and inherited xenophobia that walk the earth. Someone said once that Science only progress with funerals, I fear the same is true for society and politics.

The question still remained for me, had I been an American citizen, would i still vote Obama in the next election, despite this issue having come of light? Let me first come to say that the polices I am aware of I fully support and think are what is needed from America, things like removing lobbying influence, promoting universal healthcare and his concerns over nuclear terror.

With this in mind I think I still would. The pastor issue isn’t enough, it was a mistake sure, but lets face it I think he can be forgiven of a mistake or two in comparison to your current president who has been nothing short of a disaster.

Thanks for reading and all comments are welcome.

 


Comments (Page 1)
on Jul 01, 2008

When Obama loses, as he most certainly will, the media narrative will be... "America Not Ready for Black President." They will insist he was rejected because of race rather than his far out left wing policies.

on Jul 01, 2008

Maybe and maybe he will not be voted for his policies and i hope that if he does lose thats the reason why, but what i'm trying to point out is the sheer willingness of people to take things such as his apparent racisim as face value, what is this saying about these people?

on Jul 01, 2008
[quote]When Obama loses, as he most certainly will, the media narrative will be... "America Not Ready for Black President." They will insist he was rejected because of race rather than his far out left wing policies.[/quote

If he loses, it will not be because of skin color....imo it would be the lack of support from Clinton supporters. Its no secret, thats why the Clintons are busting their ass trying to unite the party, because their legacy is on the line. I have to give kudos to Hilary....she has done her part...now we need Bubba to come on board lol
on Jul 01, 2008

I hear a lot of people say this country is not ready to elect a black president. Granted it’s a very small demographic I’m exposed to to draw any conclusions, however I believe it to be generally true under normal circumstances. Right now however there are so many factors in Obama’s favor that could make it possible I think he’s going to win, but this is going to be a tough one to call.

You have an intense dislike for what the republicans have done in the last 8 years, more than I’ve ever seen and McCain is just another liberal republican which apparently is just too much of a contradiction to function properly. We’ve had 8 years of the most uninspiring unintelligent public speaking in the history of not just this country but in all of recorded history and Obama just happens to excel at delivering an inspiring “intelligent sounding” speech. I think most are severely underestimating how much the country is starving for just that. 

Obama was a risk for the democratic party and so was Hillary. Just about any qualified white male democrat would have easily defeated any republican in this election, just because that’s the way the public swings. Eight years of one party doing badly is long enough to make people forget that the other party was just as bad so they switch.

on Jul 01, 2008
First of all, I have to say thanks for being honest about not being very educated in US politics or the currents politicians running for president. With that said, I do have to wonder why you limit yourself to the little knowledge you have. You claim to use that 1 website for the little information you have but I don't understand how is it that having access to the Internet, with so many websites you can find information on and compare to get a better idea what is fact and what is fiction, why you chose to have an opinion based on so little information.

Now, I don't think this country is ready for a black president. It's not only there is still some racism in this country (after all that's not something only found in the US, it's a common human trait all around the world), but the lack of trust within our own people and also the ignorance that abounds the average household. It's only being black that could stop Obama from winning, the fact that he has ties to the Muslim comunity, a foulmouthed racist priest, a wife who just doesn't know when to shut up, a once political rival who made his campaign a living nightmare and is now trying to undo the damage she caused to her own party for selfish reasons and the fact that he constantly shows signed of unpatriotism (regardless how corny you may think this last fact is, people in this country take patiotism very seriously). All this, not to mention his lack of experience, his terrible voting record and many of his policies.
Bush may not have been the best thing to happen to this country lately, but as stubbyfinger put it so perfectly:

Eight years of one party doing badly is long enough to make people forget that the other party was just as bad so they switch.


Again, it goes back to ignorance, by choice, considering all the sources available to educate yourself.
on Jul 02, 2008

If the people who want a black president to demonstrate that America is ready for a black president were really ready for a minority president, why would nobody expect them to vote for a male orthodox Jewish candidate?

As minorities go, that hypothetical candidate would totally out-minority Obama. There are more blacks than Jews in the US, there are more non-orthodox Jews than orthodox Jews in the US, and there are more women than men in the US. Further Jews have in the past experienced (and in many countries still do experience) much harsher discrimination than American blacks can imagine today.

But somehow I don't see the people who support Obama because he is black (and there are many such) as possible supporters of a Jewish president, despite their claims that they are not black-supremacy racists but are just trying to make the world a better place by giving minorities a chance.

Obama's racist priest wouldn't be a problem if the two hadn't been good friends for 20 years. I would have to know someone very well before I speak of him as my spiritual guide.

Personally, I don't see an advantage in a black president. A woman president, however, would have been fun. There are today more countries that discriminate against women than against blacks, at least legally. A woman president would have sent a signal. A black president doesn't send such a signal. (To whom would he send it? Zimbabwe?)

If the first black president became president because he is black America will have failed its colour-blindness test.

 

on Jul 02, 2008

CharlesCS
First of all, I have to say thanks for being honest about not being very educated in US politics or the currents politicians running for president. With that said, I do have to wonder why you limit yourself to the little knowledge you have. You claim to use that 1 website for the little information you have but I don't understand how is it that having access to the Internet, with so many websites you can find information on and compare to get a better idea what is fact and what is fiction, why you chose to have an opinion based on so little information.

Even if i don't have enough information to form an opinion (which i think is quite a ridiculous thing to say on an internet discussion site), surely writing an article on the subject and taking in what people have to say about your opinion is only going to enhance it? More to the point it is interesting and entertaining, isn't that why we are all here?

on Jul 02, 2008
Even if i don't have enough information to form an opinion (which i think is quite a ridiculous thing to say on an internet discussion site), surely writing an article on the subject and taking in what people have to say about your opinion is only going to enhance it? More to the point it is interesting and entertaining, isn't that why we are all here?


OK, hold your horses buddy. A bit sensitive aren't we? I did not accuse you of anything, you accused yourself:

I’m not as informed as many of you regarding the current presidential race with regards to policies and so on however, as I have already said, this is my subjective view (opinion) and if anything will prove as a good way to perhaps educate myself on the subject further.


I simply questioned why you chose to have such little information as a source for your opinion having access to the Internet. Makes no sense for someone to say "I know very little so my opinion is based on that little bit of knowledge" while having access to all the information necessary to have a more solid opinion. You can base your opinion of Obama, McCain or even US politics from information found on a candy wrapper for all I care, I just think that having access to the information while purposely keeping yourself restricted to only a bit of knowledge is an excuse to me. When I first came to JU, I was beat over the head time and again how I had an opinion based on ignorance rather than doing some research before I spoke. After all, if I was able to get an account on JU and post comments and articles, then I had access to all the information available online that would allow me to have a more educated opinion rather than what I read off a billboard.

Yes, we are all here to learn and maybe even to rethink our positions. But don't you think people should at least make a small effort to learn something before stating your opinion on it? It's one thing to interpret the information you have your own way, it's another to limit your information as a choice.
on Jul 02, 2008
BTW, was the rest of my comment OK seeing as you ignored it?
on Jul 02, 2008

Charles, where did i say i specifically limited the resources i use to gain information. Instead didn't i just list the places where i get my information?

I didn't neccisarily choose to limit my information, its just the way it is. Perhaps i should have just said 'I'm not an expert on this, but here's my opinion'.

I didn't ignore the rest of your comment by the way, i just didn't have much time to respond to everyones opinion on this just yet, as i'm at work. I just went through the comments here and that particular aspects of yours stood out and i wanted to respond to it immediatley.

Part of forming a better (or in your words solid opinion) is discussing it with people whom's opinion differes to your own.

on Jul 02, 2008

stubbyfinger
We’ve had 8 years of the most uninspiring unintelligent public speaking in the history of not just this country but in all of recorded history and Obama just happens to excel at delivering an inspiring “intelligent sounding” speech.

I was told his Philadelphia was quite inspirational, yet i saw Christopher Hitchens slating it, saying it was overhyped, i think he then went on to mention Martin Luther Kings March on Washington speech in 1963, saying thats an example of inspiration.

I decided to watch the speech as i was rather intriguied by Hitchens comments as with most of what he says it goes aganist the grain so to speak, but more often than not he makes a point that most of us are too afraid to admit.  

After having done so i was somewhat dissapointed by Hitchens, i don't think it was a fair comparison to make. It's not on the same par for sure, but we live in a different era and more importantly the issues he is addressing are not as sevre in my opinion.

Il felt it showed a confident speaker, a man with intelligence, integrity and honesty. Incidentally it deals also with his former pastor also, the most important aspect is i felt he was more in touch with modern society as opposed to McCainn.  

on Jul 02, 2008

Now, I don't think this country is ready for a black president. It's not only there is still some racism in this country (after all that's not something only found in the US, it's a common human trait all around the world)

Very true, here in the United Kingdom we had a strong influx of immigration from the former colonies and dominions after the war. In my parents generation there is i feel, unfortunatley, a deep rooted distrust between different communities.

This however has eliviated slightly within my generation, this is to do thankfully to the integration of people from a young age from different ethnic and cultural background.

I'd of probably said it was a none issue, but recently however 9/11, the wars in the middle east and of course our own domestic terror incident, cultural ammonosity has to a degree raised its head, certainly with the peoples view towards people of islamic faith.

on Jul 02, 2008

Leauki
Obama's racist priest wouldn't be a problem if the two hadn't been good friends for 20 years. I would have to know someone very well before I speak of him as my spiritual guide.

Well it's a fair arguement and one that still troubles me, but as i said in my initial article not enough to convince me that Obama isn't the right man for the job.

Yet i think if you look at Obama's answer to that very critisim, he goes on to mention that many of us have disagreed on a political level with someone we can relate to on a spiritual one. Thats his arguement, not mine.

As a secularist, i can see where he comes from, what someone believes in politically should not be influenced by their religious beliefs or those whom preach religion to them.

Leauki
Personally, I don't see an advantage in a black president. A woman president, however, would have been fun. There are today more countries that discriminate against women than against blacks, at least legally. A woman president would have sent a signal. A black president doesn't send such a signal. (To whom would he send it? Zimbabwe?)If the first black president became president because he is black America will have failed its colour-blindness test. 

I think thats a huge problem with humanity, when you say 'advantage in a black president', do you mean any symbolic advantage? As thats the only advantage that you can really gain from having someone of a particular skin pigment colour.

We shouldn't be looking at them as 'A women candidate', 'Black Candidate' or 'Jewish Candidate'. We should be looking at what their policies are, what they believe in politcally and how they present these ideas to us. Isn't that where the advantages lie? Not in symbolic representation of that person from a societies piegeon holes fo categories?

 

on Jul 02, 2008
Great article, and a welcomed point of view from an outsider to this circus.

But I think you are falling for the spin, not the meat of the whole issue. The Attacks on Obama have been no more, and perhaps a bit less, than what has gone on in the past. These attacks are made against both parties (different themes, but the intent is the same). INdeed, it is the spin - by both the democrats and the Mainstream Media - that is saying that questioning Obama is racist.

Some of the comments are no doubt racist. Just as some of the comments about Hillary were sexist, and some of the comments about all the candidates are prejudicial. It is the nature of politics that many look at it as a football game (either the American or English brand is fine since fans seem to act the same way), instead of a very serious endeavor. And trash talking is the name of the game in sports.

But I am like Stubby and others. Obama's color is really irrelevant. The first will be the first because they are the first (Yea, I meant that frank burns statement). I see value in getting it out of the way so that we can put it behind us. Some of the worst race baiters are already hedging their bets saying that since Obama is not "really" black, he will not be the first and therefore they can continue race baiting. But thankfully like the KKK, those cretins are a dying breed. Not out of enlightenment, but out of apathy.

Dont fall for the spin. America is ready for a change, and that means democrat, and that means Obama. The fact that he is black is just another demographic for the national census.
on Jul 02, 2008
If america wasn't ready for a black president , obama wouldn't have won the nomination and have won primaries in very white states , such as Iowa , Montana , North Dakota , Alaska , the list goes on , plus he won over a very tough opponet. And Obama will win , everything points to an Obama advantage in this election.
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